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20130416
20130416
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
an encreasing challenge to america's military. this is the environment that is facing the department of defense as it enters a third year of flat or declining budgets. the onset of these constraints has led to belt tightening in military modernization, force structure, personnel costs and overhead expenditures. it has given us the opportunity to reshape the military and reform defense institutions to better reflect 21st century realities. the process began under the leadership of secretary gates. secretary gates curtailed more than 30 modernization programs and trimmed overhead costs within the military services and across the defense enterprise. the realignment continued secretary panetta who crafted new strategic guidance in an f.y. 2013 defense budget plan which reduced the department's top line by $487 billion over the course of a decade. the president's request of $526.6 billion for fy 2014 continues to implement the president's defense strategic guidance and enhances the department's efforts at institutional reform. most critically, it sustains the quality of the all-volunteer force and t
-rich environment for the terrorists. we've been waiting for a long team for the next incident, and tragically it just happened today in boston. >> governor, what do you glean from the information that we do have at this hour? what do you glean from the fact there was about a 14-second interval before the second bomb went off? what do you glean from the fact that there were other devices that were, thankfully, found by the police department and they were able to detonate them? does it fit any one pattern of any group? i know it's speculation, but. >> sure. first of all, i want to compliment you, you said we have more questions than answers and i think that's important. we don't want to answer our own questions until we get more information. my view has changed just even in the past couple hours. we know it was a rudiment try, fundamental device. mark furman said you can probably make a similar device with ingredients from your own home. but at one time it was two devices and one two undetonated now there may be as many as five. then the question becomes is there one person involved? unlikely,
improvement. what does it feel like on the ground? do peel feel like we are in another high risk environment given this mass murder? >> i was in manhattan the day of 9/11. so it feels, it felt similar for maybe 10 or 12 hours but it seems like boston is back going about its day. not unlike the way new york kind of recovered as quickly as they did. i think one has to hope that the communicate responds quickly. that they're resilient. i think that the international nature of the boston marathon is helpful in an odd way at this point. people will go back to their countries and be as resilient as we need to be as americans. i think that these people who were engaged in this thing were out here living a purpose driven life. they were raising capital and raising funds for things that mattered to them. they were here for causes and in many instances and i think if the history is any judge, they'll be back to doing that very quickly. >> amen. thank you very much for that. >> up next, why would someone do this? we'll get into that question next. money. that's not much, you think. except it's 2% every
neighborhood and dangerous environment. earlier today we had a terrible tragedy in the united states in boston, where lives were lost, in what seems to be a bombing or potential terrorist attack. i don't want to jump to conclusion and as a new yorker who lived through september 11, 2001, terrorism is something that whenever it rears its ugly head, all people of goodwill must condemn it. people of israel voo lived through that and lived through bombings at pizza shops and weddings and random bombings of people who don't care about life but care about death. so we pause, of course, for the loss of life in boston today and understand that when israel has gone through a terrorist attack, there is a similar crying out of wanton acts of terror. . i just returned from israel, i had the honor to have traveling there with president obama. the president is working feverishly to try to move toward a two-state solution which all of us believe is the best thing that could happen, a palestinian state and an israeli jewish state and certainly the united states its allay, stand by israel. i'll be going -- its
east have more experience with terrorism. and their security environment reflect that reality. but here in the u.s., there is a delicate balancing act between liberty and security. and it's still a work in progress. bret? >> bret: steve centanni live here in d.c. steve, thank you. some of the most compelling accounts to come out of boston are from the eyewitnesses. and the people who tried to help. correspondent douglas kennedy has that part of the story. [explosion] >> the bomb that where to through boilston street took with it lives and dreams. in fact, many people in boston and the nation. especially those who saw the mayhem firsthand. >> it went off, you know, my ears, you know, just from the compression of the explosive device hit us and shattered the window next to us. and, you know, and i looked back and i see a cloud of smoke. >> it took probably five or ten seconds to realize what had happened because it couldn't happen there. so, it was just too surreal. >> still personal tragedy quickly turned into communal hope as the city almost instantly came together. to comfort the falle
some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions one of -- some key questions we wanted to address this point but to the treatment of suspects -- rise to the level of torture quick secondly, if so, how did this happen? and what can we learn from this to make better decisions in the future? on the first question, we found that u.s. personnel in many instances use interrogation techniques on detainees that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations that involve cruel, inhumane or degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. laws and international treaty obligations. this conclusion is not based upon our own personal impressions, but rather is grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees in many instances met the standards, the courts have determined as constituting torture. but in addition you look at the united states state department in its annual count
in an urban environment and there's a lot of buildings around and other materials that will stop some of this evidence as it crawls across the pavement and it will be found. the agents will go in and start conducting a crime scene investigation to find even the most minute pieces of evidence and what we call bag and tag and send to the laboratory. in the laboratory, the forensic scientists, examiners, will look at these pieces of debris and then start making conclusions as to what the device consisted of. >> how do you-- i understand how you could piece together what was the bomb made of. how did it work, how was it detonated and so on. but how-- we're told in the pan am 103 bombing which you helped investigate, that it was a thumbnail sized piece of evidence that led to the identity of the bomber. i mean, how can that be? how can you get to the identity from the remnants of the bomber? >> well, sometimes in pan am 103, the fragment of the circuit board that was the timer that detonated the device, is so generically-- well, not generically, but so specific you can relate that back to
ripe environment, target rich environment. it's just tragic to go from this horrific scene, i think everybody was just shocked, but i'll tell you what, i'm angry. i know a lot of other people are angry. i got a text, a long text from doug flutie, former quarterback, as you know, boston college fame, saying where do i sign up? who do we go and get? you see joann drowsy helping out a -- andruzi helping out. we're going to do a top to bottom review of what went right and wrong and make sure it doesn't happen again. >> steve: i understand the anger. but you look at all the first responders, all the police officers, all the national guardsmen who were there yesterday. the city was vigilant. yet it just takes one. >> listen, it does take one. certainly because it is the marathon, it is the showcase, really of the city and the state, you have all those people there anyway. thank goodness they were actually there because the first responders, the medical personnel, the tents are right there. they're able to adjust from high duration to almost like a war type of reaction, type of force to pr
, constructing support mounts for objects, doing additional cleaning in a dry, stable environment. b. altman goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share as much of the story of how these pumps operated, how they were made, what you're used for, their historical accounts from the sinking. we know that up to last when water put out the oilers, the pumps stopped moving. those are the things to consider is when dupont got here, the valve was still in position at its last moment. the think of the crew of monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve c it ison and how ironi that today 100 petite years later they are still serving the nation in ways they could never have imagined, helping us understand marine conservation, understanding our past, and helping us look forward and learned from the lessons of the past. >> this weekend, looking at the history and literary lights for virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on american on c-span3. >> washington journal
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)